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Hungry, Why Wait! "Free the Titty"


Growing up in the 1990's I never heard of people shaming women for feeding their children in public. In fact, it was second nature to me and normal after watching generations of women in my family feed their babies without backlash. It could have been that I was too young and ignorant to the adult world that surrounded me to notice the ridicule women received. But as I grew older, the world around me changed. People have become more accepting of violence and natural occurrences such as feeding a child has become plagued and sexualized.



Once into adulthood and after having my first child, it began. I breastfed my oldest child for 11 months. Nothing can replace the bond that is built between a mother and child while breastfeeding. It is a connection like no other. Internally feeling amazing about giving my child the best option for her, I was met with the external expectations of the world that I wasn't quite prepared for.



This new feeling wasnt pleasant. It was disheartening, it was upsetting, it was scary. People looking over their shoulders in disgust as your child eats, it made me want to cover myself. Throw a shawl on or a blanket over my babies head. Id run into the family bathrooms to feed her while my food sat getting cold at the restaurant table, all to not offend another patron. I was aggravated and confused as to why something that was the natural intended use be so disrespectful to others. Many times I would really think, "What did my boob do to you?"




Baby number 2, years later I said to hell with that! I will feed my child wherever, whenever and for however long she'd like. I was not going to allow distasteful comments and rude stares to halt my child from her meal and I felt no other women should either. breast covers became burp cloths, quick release bras became the norm and mentally I felt free. Free of all the self criticism that I placed upon myself from worrying about what others would think, say or do. I breastfed 3 children and wouldn't have changed my decision if I had to do it all over again.


With all the chit chat about breastfeeding in public on social media, I felt inclined to take a stand for the hundreds of thousands of women that are dealing with the uncomfortable feeling of breastfeeding their child under the criticizing eye of the general public. Most that post their disgust publicly are men. Funnily enough, men don't have breast nor feed a child unless its through a supplement. So how could they have so much input on what we as women do with our bodies or our children?





So much in today's society has become over sexualized and breastfeeding has become one of the most public topics of discussion. It still is shocking to me when I see headlines "Breastfeeding in public is now accepted in all 50 states". I didn't even know it wasn't acceptable. With the start of National Breastfeeding Week I decided to shoot with a few breastfeeding mothers who confidently fed their children in public for the world to see.


I got to experience joy on an entirely different level. Capturing a bond so unbreakable and visualizing from the outside in how happiness looks. I absolutely loved every minute of shooting this series. Knowing it was for a good cause and having the opportunity to take a stand regardless of how minute it may have been made me feel so accomplished.



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